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3 Perennial Alliums Collection: Welsh Bunching Onion, Garlic Chives & Chives

£1.79

3 different perennial alliums: Allium Fistulosum, Allium Tuberosum & Allium Schoenoprasum.

Once established they can all be propagated by division.

Welsh Bunching Onion: A strong onion flavour, it can be used in salads, as a cooked vegetable or as a flavouring in cooked foods.

A very hardy species, it is related to the cultivated onion (A. cepa) and could be of value in breeding programmes. It is sometimes cultivated in the garden for its edible leaves which can be produced throughout the winter if the weather is not too severe. A very popular cultivated vegetable in the Orient.

Plants will often retain their leaves even when covered in snow. They are also tolerant of high temperatures and can be grown in the tropics. 

The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply.

Sow spring in a greenhouse. The seed germinates over a wide range of temperatures, it is faster at higher temperatures. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. When well-grown, the plants should be ready to be planted out in the summer. If they are not large enough at this time, grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter and plant them out in late spring.

An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil but tolerates most soils including those that are damp and acid.

Division of the plants is very easy and can be done at almost any time of the year though the spring is probably best. The divisions can be planted out straight into their permanent positions if required.

Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other.

The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles.

An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil but tolerates most soils including those that are damp and acid.

Garlic Chives: A mild flavour, somewhat like a cross between garlic and chives, they are delicious in salads.

This species is being increasingly grown as a garden vegetable in Britain. A very ornamental plant, it grows well as an edging plant in the flower garden.

Sow spring in a cold frame. The seed has a fairly short viability and should not be used when more than 1 year old. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle - if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Plant out in late summer if the plants have developed sufficiently, otherwise plant them out the following spring.

An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a rich moist but well-drained soil.

This plant succeeds in temperate and tropical climates. It appears to be fully hardy in Britain.

The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other.

Chives are commonly cultivated in the garden for their edible leaves which are available from late winter to the beginning of the following winter. The bulbs divide rapidly and large clumps are quickly formed.

An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a rich moist but well-drained soil, though it succeeds in most soils and also in light shade. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Tolerates a pH in the range 5.2 to 8.3.

Chives are very tolerant of heavy harvesting, regular cutting of the leaves ensures a continuous supply of young leaves and prevents the plants flowering. Plants can be moved into a frame or other protected environment in the autumn and will then produce leaves throughout the winter. Do not do this every year or it weakens the plants. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply.

A good bee plant. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. Helps to reduce the incidence of scab when it is grown under apple trees. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other.

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